Ameerega shihuemoy, new species, described from Peru, and account added for Andinobates opisthomelas

| Uncategorized | One Comment

A new species, Ameerega shihuemoy, has been described from Peru. The new species, described by Rojas-Serrano and colleagues in Zootaxa, is known from Madre de Dios department in Peru, in the vicinity of Manu National park. Although the new species somewhat resembles A. yungicola, it is in fact a close relative of A. macero, which also occurs in the region. Overall this paper was extremely thorough, using a combination of phylogenetics, bioacoustics, and morphology. Serrano-Rojas, S.J., A. Whitworth, J. Villacampa, R. von May, R.C. Gutierrez, J.M. Padial, & J.C. Chaparro (2017). A new species of poison-dart frog (Anura:Dendrobatidae) from Manu…

Account added for Andinobates abditus

| New species accounts | No Comments

With the update of this website, one of our new goals is to add species accounts for the entire subfamily Dendrobatinae, rather than focusing only on Peruvian species. With that in mind, we’re happy to announce that an account for the enigmatic species Andinobates abditus has been added. This account was contributed by Santiago Ron from AmphibiaWeb Ecuador who offered to allow us to post a translation of their account. Andinobates abditus is one of only few remaining “lost species”. It has not been seen in decades, despite relatively recent attempts to find it. Given that there are only two…

Updates!

| General Updates, New Species / Taxonomy | No Comments
After several years of dormancy, dendrobates.org has been updated. The current format allows for easier posting of blog-like updates, where the plan is to post about current research on poison dart frogs. Although I have wanted to update the website for a long time, it wasn’t until I was contacted by Erik Melander that the project materialized. Erik generously offered to do a website redesign (more of a resurrection, really), while also offering to stay on as website administrator. Since the last website updates, there have been a number of new species described. One of these, Excidobates condor (Almendariz et...

Mimicry in Ranitomeya imitator

| Featured Species Articles | One Comment
Why does mimicry evolve? Mimicry refers to shared warning coloration between co-occurring species. There are two main classes of mimicry: Batesian, and Müllerian. Batesian mimicry is when a non-toxic species resembles a toxic species. The benefits of Batesian mimicry are fairly obvious: by resembling a toxic species, a non-toxic species “tricks” a predator into thinking it is toxic, and thus avoids being attacked. Müllerian mimicry is when two (or more) toxic species share a common warning coloration. This spreads the cost of predator learning across a larger pool of individuals, reducing the per-capita mortality rate. In Müllerian mimicry, because both...